Hybrid prosthetics: Bridging the gap

In this blog post we discuss  photogrammetry, 3D printing, Zbrush and VR digital models. 
It is designed to give an overview of the new technologies and includes an exercise that can be delivered in about 30 minutes.
The aim of the exercise is to bridge the gap between digital and traditional methods.This is achieved by using the familiar concept of lifecasting using KEY-FORM in order to show how 3D printed elements can be transferred into traditional elements (or used in their own right) to make a silicone head or fibreglass core.
Key-form is used for ease but, this will also work with other silicones and soft mould making materials. Please read the data and COSHH sheets when using alternative products.
If you would like to learn more about prosthetics or where to study please get in touch. Digitally printed casts in resin and plaster are available from Backface studios. 
Tell me more about studying prosthetics

Forbes @ Backface studios full

FORBES ARTICLE
Resin_face_print_backface

Gypsum print / Resin print / Fast cast PU / Fibreglass

Digital prints and cast cores

Materials needed:

  1. 40g KEY-FORM: 10g A & B by weight (20g total for beauty layer and backing layer)
  2. 4 small cups for mixing
  3. Two large mixing cups cut down at 150ml 
  4. 7 wooden mixing sticks  (2 marked ‘A’, 2 marked ‘B’, 2 marked ‘M’ and one as a baton for mod rock)
  5. Consumable brushes: one small detail brush, one medium and one large for backing layer 
  6. Digital scales (g) 
  7. Timers 
  8. Vinyl gloves (not latex) 
  9. 3D printed positive 
  10. Optional items related to desired outcome (Modrock, PU resin, Laminating resin, fibreglass etc.)

Method:

  1. Weigh out 10g of KEY-NOTE A and B into small measuring cups using marked wooden spatulas. Do not cross contaminate the product at source.
  2. Start the timer
  3. Spatula part A and part B onto opposite sides of the mixing cut and scrape off with the wooden stick marked M until the colour blue and purple are blended together. 
  4. Begin to mix the KEY-FORM with the wooden spatula marked M. 
  5. You now have five minutes working time. 
  6. Using a fine consumable brush begin to brush the mixed KEY-FORM into the eyes, nose and mouth of the 3D printed cast. It’s important to use a thin layer to avoid air bubbles. Once the eyes nose and mouth have had a beauty layer, swap brushes to the middle brush and use this for the rest of the 3D printed cast. 
  7. As five minutes approaches brush a slightly thicker layer, a rougher texture will give the backing layer something to hold onto. 
  8. Leave for ten minutes to cure.

SHOP NEILLS MATERIALS ON THE LINKS BELOW

KEY-FORM (NEILLS MATERIALS)
EASYFLO 120
MODROCK
WOODEN STICKS
GLOVES
CUPS

Forbes @ Backface studios extract

Neil Hughes @ Backface studios - Promotional video

BACKFACE WEBSITE

Life casting silicone head recap by Tested

TESTED YOUTUBE CHANNEL

Presentation Slides 

3d_printing

NEIL HUGHES PRODUCTIONS

MAKING YOUR PARTIES, LEGENDARY

Costume – Special Effects Make-up – Performers – Lecturing

 

Location –

London – England

Contact

Email : info@neilhughes.co.uk

 

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